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29 October 2010 @ 11:34 am
Amanda's FK Vid  
Amanda B., who used to be a frequent fkfic-l writer but has not played FK in years, recently shared her very first FK vid, to Loreena McKennitt's "Prospero's Speech," and I wanted to pass on the link.  It's not a customary music video approach as much as a collection of filtered dialogue clips with music as webbing.  It starts in the second-season present, drops back to Nick's mortality, and then climbs up the years to the second-season present.  It's gen -- or "bring your own goggles," as they say.

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greerwatsongreerwatson on October 30th, 2010 10:53 am (UTC)
You know this would be the absolutely perfect quickie intro to the series to demonstrate what it's all about. It succinctly covers the premise and the quest, with sufficient clarity (I think) for anyone to grasp what is going on. The perfect trailer.

I've made it a wiki page: http://foreverknight.wikia.com/wiki/Prospero%27s_Speech

Mea culpa (and head to desk!), fan though I am, I could not—off the top of my head—identify one of the clips. Can you help?

By the way, not wanting to put full names here, is this Amanda B? I do like to associate all of an author's oeuvre, whenever possible.
Amy R.: Remote Controlbrightknightie on October 30th, 2010 04:57 pm (UTC)
>"I could not—off the top of my head—identify one of the clips. Can you help?"

Yes, the clip presently listed as unidentified on the wiki, the one used as the "present-day" tag for the vid, is the very end of "Near Death."

Additionally, the flashback segment currently identified as from "Dance By the Light of the Moon" is not. It is instead from "Near Death," which has the extended take on Nick's conversion, and slightly different hair and costumes. (In first-season DBLM's version, Lacroix has only one line before biting Nick; in second-season ND, he has that whole speech.)

If you couldn't recognize it instantly, I believe you are lucky to have a happy re-viewing of that episode to look forward to. For me, ND is a highly frustrating, but also highly engaging, episode; I love it and also love to hate it; it is one of my favorites, in a push-and-pull way, and pivotal to my construction of the metaphysics of vampirism in the FK story.

As to identifying the vid creator, yes, that's her. I'm hesitant to connect identities searchably without permission, so I've emailed her with these links and your email address, so that she can know and confirm how she's identified. She does still have her full name up on her FK webpages, but I'm cautious.

>"You know this would be the absolutely perfect quickie intro to the series to demonstrate what it's all about."

"Perfect" is too strong for me. :-) The vid is very nice, but like any crafted narrative, its choices about what to include and omit advance a specific emphasis with which one may agree or disagree. To someone who already knows the text, the vid presents a position about the text. It would be an excellent first introduction for someone whose tastes ran in that line, but ineffective for someone who might be captured by the many other aspects of FK.

For example, this vid grants Natalie many segments of dialogue, but renders Janette silent. Its footage comes almost exclusively from second season, with the lightest sprinkling of first; that is a heavy interpretive choice, as first and third each have their own distinct slants. Nothing is shown of Nick's police work in the vid, though that is the whole superstructure of the series. Putting Gwyneth's prediction that Nick will "never" know happiness at the start of someone'e experience with FK could be considered to compromise the mood of first season, where he certainly seems to approach happiness (and it echoes the HL episode "The Darkness," and so could mislead an HL fan). Similarly, ending with the "Near Death" platitude could be considered by someone who has a theological disagreement with that final statement -- someone who thinks Nick sadly missed the whole point of his ND experience -- as privileging a mistaken interpretation (ND is a thistle thicket of traditional Christian theological contentions, grace v. works, etc.).
greerwatsongreerwatson on October 30th, 2010 10:34 pm (UTC)
"ND is [...] pivotal to my construction of the metaphysics of vampirism in the FK story."

Me too. Not to mention the medical aspects: between ND and "Dead of Night", it is clear that FK vampires are not resurrected corpses in any way shape or form, since they never actually die.
Amy R.: Character Deathbrightknightie on October 31st, 2010 10:58 pm (UTC)
>"Not to mention the medical aspects: between ND and "Dead of Night", it is clear that FK vampires are not resurrected corpses in any way shape or form, since they never actually die."

While that is one interpretation of FK's melange of mechanics of vampirism, I wish to disagree both with the idea that it is a required interpretation and the assertion that it becomes "clear" in those specific episodes.

In "Near Death," Natalie asks how long Nick has been dead, and acts on that information. Later, she verbally reassures Schanke that Nick was never really dead, but her mannerisms there strongly suggest that she is misleading Schanke to cover Nick's secret, as she does in many episodes, dating back to falsely informing Schanke, in "Dark Knight, The Second Chapter," that blood can "evaporate" from a corpse. ND does not force its viewer to interpret that Nick never died, then or in the flashback; indeed, it suggests that he does die, paralleling the scientist whose death starts the case.

In "Dead of Night," Nick waits for Alyssa's spirit to return to her body, having chosen to become a vampire. It doesn't. However, the fact that he waits -- that he does not perceive her physical death as an obstacle to this return -- suggests that physical death is not an obstacle. When Lacroix says that the spark is gone and the fire is out, he may as easily mean that the spirit has conclusively departed -- gone through the door -- as that physical death is a barrier. The emphasis on taking "too much" seems likely to mean that leaving too little makes it impossible for the spirit to return, not necessarily that the effective amount, whatever it may be, does not cause death.

"Fatal Mistake" and "Last Knight" both have interesting content on this point, of course, but "Near Death" is the most explicit.

Most of all in first season, but throughout the series, Nick asserts that he died when he became a vampire. Granted, Natalie disagrees with him. Surely their canonical disagreement indicates that canon is open to both interpretations?

Such a discussion really should best begin with a definition of death. Like the moment at which life begins, the moment at which it ends is subject to philosophy as well as biology. The last breath, the last heartbeat, the last brainwave, they perhaps provide a different answer than the moment the spirit permanently departs.

The concept of the moment of death, a transitional instant when death is true and complete but decay has not yet begun, plays a role in my religious faith. That of course makes me likely to see it in FK, but I don't believe I am overlooking concrete evidence to the contrary.
greerwatsongreerwatson on November 1st, 2010 11:14 pm (UTC)
I was actually thinking particularly of the fact that these are two episodes in which the newly bitten human drinks blood from his/her prospective master before awakening as a vampire. In "Dead of Night", it is quite clear that, when Nick tries to give Alyssa some of his blood, it runs out of her mouth without her drinking any of it. She's already either dead or dying—certainly too far gone to drink, as she needs to.

On the other hand, in "Near Death", Nick's vision starts after he is bitten but before he drinks LaCroix's blood. Since I doubt if they are able to drink blood after they die, it follows that Nick is still alive when he's having his vision. I think. If I'm not misremembering, that is. (You're quite right that it's been a while.)
greerwatsongreerwatson on October 30th, 2010 10:50 pm (UTC)
""Perfect" is too strong for me. :-) The vid is very nice, but like any crafted narrative, its choices about what to include and omit advance a specific emphasis with which one may agree or disagree."

True. I did overstate things a bit: a Ravenette would deplore the absence of Janette; and Forever Knight was, after all, a cop show —in format, as well as the whole Crimetime after Prime Time thing.

I think I was, more than anything, comparing it in my mind to one of those irritating one-hour special retrospectives they sometimes do on TV—a look back at M*A*S*H, that sort of thing. In between the too-short snippets of interviews, you get asinine chat from a "host" who clearly was hired for name appeal rather than knowledge of the show, plus a collection of badly chosen clips from the episodes. Badly chosen, not just because any fan could think of better ones, but also because they're usually far too long.

There are obviously other ways to approach FK: as you say, there are quite a number of themes not dealt with in the vid. It did, however, succinctly sum up some of the major aspects of the show—at least something of the relationship between Nick and LaCroix, and their conflict over his quest for mortality.

What would be really nice would be a small collection of similar vids tackling other aspects of the show. However, as you pointed out originally, "It's not a customary music video approach." As a rule, vids are largely comprehensible only to the initiate. I do think that—albeit only partially—this vid (and others like it, if they were made) would serve as intelligible introductions to the series for people who don't know Forever Knight. Of course, I'm hardly in a position to say that for certain—despite my failure to identify a couple of "Near Death" clips.
Amy R.: Trio Nick Natalie Schankebrightknightie on October 31st, 2010 11:08 pm (UTC)
Some mini-documentaries in the form of a cross between music videos and clip shows, yes, that could be a nice thing to have around.

I don't know whether anyone ever actually made it, but back when vids were made from VHS tapes, we used to joke what it would be like to edit together all the 1228 flashbacks in precise chronological order, with the costumes, hair and sets flipping back and forth between their presentations in the assorted episodes. Possibly a music video approach could soften those transitions without distorting the chain of events.
jekyllhj7 on October 31st, 2010 05:27 pm (UTC)
Yes it's me
Yes it is my video. I just did a kind of 'quick' retrospective type video because I've been away from the fandom for a while and I am still trying to remember what was in what episode. As of now the first season I have is kind of dark, so I shied away from those clips. I've had to get the clips from other people because my computers refuse to rip. Couldnt' find season 3. I do have some more ideas and hopefully I can get them done. Yes, I do have ideas for Janette, etc. This one was more general.
Thanks for all your kind comments. And feel free to put it on the wiki.
-Amanda
greerwatsongreerwatson on October 31st, 2010 06:27 pm (UTC)
Re: Yes it's me
This was such a lovely vid—I do hope you make more.
Valerie - Postmodern Pollyanna: viddingwiliqueen on November 1st, 2010 12:11 am (UTC)
Oooh, that definitely sounds like something to check out when I'm on the desktop! Thank you for the heads-up.
PJ1228pj1228 on November 1st, 2010 09:25 pm (UTC)
Thanks for sharing this. It's lovely. I haven't heard the song before (I've heard the speech, of course) and it fits wonderful.