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13 September 2009 @ 08:54 pm
Some Potential Slash Pairings in FK  

I like to tell myself -- and sometimes other people, so stop me if you've heard this one -- that what I'm looking for in fanfiction is a good story.  Not necessarily gen or romance, straight or slash, just good storytelling however it comes.  Of course it's more complicated than that.  I'm a canon junkie, for starters.  (Mmmmmm, canon.)  I prefer G and PG tales to R and NC-17 ones.  I fall all over accurate historical fiction.  (Mmmmmm, history.)  I won't touch RPF with a twenty-nine-and-a-half-foot pole.  And then let's define "good," never forget. ;-)  But generally?  A good story in any genre.

Other people, wonderful people I know and love, must have one particular subgenre or another to fully engage their fannish hearts.  And yes, they're correct that FK doesn't overwhelm with canonical possibilities those who love slash best, but who are not UFers.  I submit that FK is not a wasteland for them, either, though.  Bring your own scenarios.  Elisabeth, this is for you:

M/M
Vampire/Human
M/M
Vampire/Vampire
M/M
Human/Human
Nick/Bernhardt Toeffler
Nick/Nicholas Toeffler [Surname] (Lily's son)
Nick/Matthew (no...)
Nick/Lionel
Nick/Gordon Barrington (before Katherine)
Nick/Charles duChamps
Nick/Leonardo Davinci
Nick/Leo (OtLi flashback)
Lacroix/Adult!Andre
Nick/Lacroix
Nick/Feliks
Nick/Larry Merlin
Lacroix/Vamps he set on Sylvaine and Nick
Nick/Miklos
Lacroix/Thomas
Lacroix/Tran
Nick/Vachon
Lacroix/Vachon
Miklos/Vachon
Vachon/Bourbon
Inca/Vachon
Aristotle?
Screed?
Spark?
The CRCH guest stars?
Nick between Brabant and Wales?  Between Wales and Paris?
Cal?
Adult!Patrick McDonough?
F/F
Vampire/Human
F/F
Vampire/Vampire
F/F
Human/Human
Janette/Natalie
Erica/Natalie
Janette/Mai Chung
Janette/Rebecca
Erica/Rebecca
Janette/Sofia
Janette/Bernice
Sofia/Bernice (or Agnes or Norma)
Janette/Emily
Janette/Helen Ruskin-Slater
Janette/Sofia
Janette/Erica
Janette/Francesca
Janette/Alyce
Janette/Elizabeth
Janette/Serena
Sofia/Serena
Erica/Serena
Janette/Urs
Sofia/Urs
Serena/Urs
Angel/Urs (dreamscape or something)
Urs/Jacqueline et. al.
Janette/Jacqueline et. al.
Brianna?
Alma?
Alexandra?
Divia?  (ick, no)
Marilyn Siegel/Doctor Cole
Natalie/Denise Ford
Natalie/Alix Logan
Natalie/Rebecca
Rebecca/Alix Logan
Natalie/Tawny Teller
Monica Howard/Angie W.
Kiki/Norma
Katherine Barrington/Madelyn Pinchot
Janette/Anna
Tracy/Jody
Natalie/Tracy (no)
Natalie/Lora Haynes
Grace?
Adult!Jenny Schanke?
Adult!Lisa Cooper?
Fleur?
 
 
 
chelseagirlchelseagirl on September 14th, 2009 10:37 am (UTC)
I always thought Nick/Lacroix was a pretty obvious pairing, what with Lacroix's total obsession/control thing for Nick, and the fact that it's pretty clear he's way more concerned with Nick than he is with Janette.
Amy R.: Fleur & Lacroixbrightknightie on September 19th, 2009 05:33 pm (UTC)
Yes, I believe that almost everyone agrees with you now that there is a sexual component to Lacroix's attitude toward Nick. It's been many years since I've seen a coherent argument against the canonical presence of that element (might have been my own plea, come to think of it, shortly before a debate with batdina in a line at an airport in January '97 ~g~ which she, naturally, won).

The interpretive questions that lead to debates and different story perspectives, of course, are whether that element is for the benefit or detriment of the characters, and whether, when and how it was ever reciprocated. Mmmmm, interpretive questions! ;-)

Being my Fleur-obsessed self, I personally get caught up in the Nick:Fleur aspect -- that is, who is standing in for whom, when, and to what degree, in Lacroix's mind. As I'm an old-fashioned Knightie rather than a Dark one, I've never had much truck with anything that returns Nick to Lacroix's side (except, of course, as tragedy), but there are many rich stories depicting Nick as a survivor of Lacroix's abuse, whether metaphorically or literally or a combination... again, an entirely canonical construction, not only because of the AFWTD exchange.

I made this particular post specifically because someone expressed that she feels there is no place for her to play in FK because she is a slasher but not a UFer -- meaning not that she doesn't think that element exists, but rather that she doesn't enjoy it. I knew it was nearly hopeless, but I wanted to offer a cheerful suggestion that actually there are openings for her to tell and share lovely stories in FK, still, if she ever wants to come play again.
dj_clawsondj_clawson on September 16th, 2009 08:28 pm (UTC)
I can't imagine Feliks with Nick. In slash, essentially, straight guys date straight guys. It's all about overtones. Feliks is just gay. He should be with another gay guy.

I think in my Aristotle AU universe, Feliks and Aristotle had sex like once, when Feliks was really young and lonesome for his master after getting kicked out of the nest. I've never mentioned it, except maybe once in passing. And also, Aristotle and Nick, but Aristotle's kind of a "I'll take what I can get, I'm old and bald" kind of guy.

On principle, slash is about straight guys having sex with other straight guys, written by straight women. If you want to see gay men writing slash, there's the Nifty archives, in the celebrity/fanfic section. It's a completely different genre.
Amy R.: Castbrightknightie on September 19th, 2009 09:25 pm (UTC)
Likely, this is the sort of exchange that would go most smoothly in person, with tone and expression to help guide each step and move easily to understanding. You and I do not know each other's backgrounds in this. We've accidentally ended up on some difficult ground; I hope to navigate out.

>"On principle, slash is about straight guys having sex with other straight guys, written by straight women."

Your definition is pithy. However, it is also inadequate and rather upsetting. Besides setting an absolute conceptualization of the characters and excluding f/f stories from the larger genre of slash, it denies the existence and contributions of lesbian and bisexual authors of m/m stories.

All the m/m slash authors I personally know in real life -- on the other side of the computer screen -- identify as lesbian or bisexual. That may well be unusual, but it is my experience. And the specific beloved friend to whom I addressed the list of scenarios in the post, whom I hoped to cheerfully tease into thinking of returning to FK, which she left over a decade ago, is herself a skilled, prolific, lesbian author of mainly m/m stories. A thread hostile to her is the last thing I imagined when I made this post. Laughing at my ineptness? Sure! Denying the possibility of her existence? Never.

Slash fans can best define slash. Academia tries, and periodically the media, but they rarely come close to encompassing the entire phenomenon. It's not my home genre and I don't pretend to grasp it better than other outsiders, but I have been around long enough to believe I have some feel for what it is and is not under the shifting vocabulary and trends. Whether with characters who are canonically homosexual or characters whose creators assure us that they are not, fanfiction writers and readers who see them as such gather together in community under the "slash" appellation. The contributions and preferences I have seen there are much more diverse than your initial definition would allow.
dj_clawsondj_clawson on September 21st, 2009 12:10 am (UTC)
I apologize. I did not mean to be offensive or encompass the whole of slash, or even discuss f/f or femslash. I was speaking of generalities. In GENERAL slash as we encounter it in the fanfic realm - as opposed to gay fiction written for a gay audience - is written by women. In general those women are straight. In slash panels at conventions I've been to, I would say the audience was about 95% female, with some guys who were accompanying their wives or life partners. The percentage of women who write slash and are lesbian themselves (or bi) is probably severely underestimated because (a) writers don't report their sexuality as often as they report their gender and (b) there is a healthy, established community of lesbian fiction that grew up independent of slash and researchers incorrectly assume lesbian writers are going to write lesbian fiction and nothing else.

The point I was trying to make, which is something that academia has written about (see the book "Textual Poachers"), is that there is often a significant, obvious difference in the way gay fiction by gay men is written and the way gay fiction/slash by straight women is written. Over the years I've seen many exceptions to this rule, and this rule has even been called misogynistic by other scholars (it asserts that men are obsessed with penetration and ejaculation in fiction, the male act of sex, while women are obsessed with the more "loving" parts of sex - the emotional component, caressing, description and tone, etc etc), but there is still for the most part a stark difference between gay fiction and slash. One of those differences is that slash often involves characters who are, in their original show/tv/book/movie, clearly straight, whereas in gay fiction the characters often identify themselves as actively "gay."

I apologize if this is offensive to anyone. It's not a cold and hard fact but an academic assertion; if you can provide links that prove me wrong, I'm open to reading them.
Amy R.: Torontobrightknightie on September 27th, 2009 09:50 pm (UTC)
on fanfiction called slash and femmeslash (01/02)
>"I apologize."

Thank you very much. I specifically pointed this out to the friend for whom the post was originally meant, so it is confirmed to have reached her. We're all set, then: we're disagreeing a bit, completely civilly and without any ill-intent.

I am not the best person to engage on this genre. I'm not even a slash fan. However, the people I know who are slash fans and do have all the academic knowledge are also lesbian or bisexual, and are too long in fandom to care to run this out again with a new person, especially over here in FK. So I'm just doing my best to sketch my respect for the contributions of the significant portion of fandom that is not heterosexual and chooses to write m/m fanfiction.

Yes, I have been told by those who regularly read both that m/m fanfiction usually differs from m/m original stories written by men, most especially the "adult" content. There's no controversy about that. I did not understand your comment in the way you meant it, to be primarily about that. I understood your comment to be about what I had been thinking of when I wrote my post, both m/m and f/f fanfiction (which was called "slash" in common when I learned the term, but which I'm told must now be distinguished as "slash" versus "femmeslash," which I find vaguely sexist, and ironically so -- just like "fpreg," for crying out loud -- but that's another story, and I shan't be understood if I stick to the other way, so I surrender the term).

Regarding m/m fanfiction being usually written by women, absolutely it is.  Pretty much all fanfiction is usually written by women.  In my experience, there are always some male writers around, of all sexual orientations, writing in all genres, and we're glad to have them, but they are a distinct minority.  There are more of them over in Trek, but in all these years in FK, I can still count on my fingers the writers who have openly identified as male (either using traditionally male names and not disclaiming to be male, or using neutral names and self-identifying as male).  It's a longstanding, only half-joking, lament: where are all the single straight fanboys for all the single straight fangirls?  Creative fandom is peculiarly divided by sex.

Regarding most m/m fan writers being heterosexual, again, most of the population is heterosexual, of course, no question. ~shrug~

>"The percentage of women who write slash and are lesbian themselves (or bi) is probably severely underestimated because (a) writers don't report their sexuality as often as they report their gender and (b) there is a healthy, established community of lesbian fiction that grew up independent of slash and researchers incorrectly assume lesbian writers are going to write lesbian fiction and nothing else."

Yes, underestimated by outsiders in exactly that way, certainly. Fans should have the opportunity to observe each other better. Again, however, we're walking around a distinction between original fiction by lesbian authors, and fanfiction by lesbian authors, whether the content is gen or romance, straight or slash/femmeslash. One thing about fanfiction, and the particular delicious experience of sharing a universe, is that one must work with the characters given, and not a lot of television or movie canon gives multiple female significant characters to begin with. But that might sound dismissive, and I do not mean it to -- the authors I know write their chosen m/m genre and pairings because they love them, not because they lack alternatives.

Your original pithy summation, while true for all the generalities above, struck me as briskly exclusionary of the important population of lesbian and bisexual women m/m fan writers, and it struck me acutely for all the people I know and love in that population. I do not have data on how overrepresented, compared to representation in the general population, lesbians are in fanfiction writing in general or m/m fanfiction writing in particular, but my experience leads me to believe that the difference is significant.

[to be continued in another reply, because of LJ limits]
Amy R.: Torontobrightknightie on September 27th, 2009 09:52 pm (UTC)
on fanfiction called slash and femmeslash (02/02)
[continued from the previous reply because of LJ limits]

>"(see the book "Textual Poachers"),"

Has it been updated? I popped over to Amazon, and didn't see a new edition. The copy of Textual Poachers that I was handed in grad school over a decade ago was not fresh off the presses even then, and I submit that a great deal has changed in the past several years in social attitudes and in technology that has had huge impacts on the larger society, as well as fandom in general, and slash (and "femmeslash") fandom in particular.

JADFE ("James and Darkangel's Forever Erotica"), the original FK erotica mailing list, originally spun off from fkfic-l not for "adult" content, as one would suppose, but rather for slash/femmeslash content of any rating. Today, that's laughable. If I recall correctly, when Textual Poachers was first published, exclusion was ordinary, and email lists were innovative. The world has turned a few times since then, thank goodness.

>>"One of those differences is that slash often involves characters who are, in their original show/tv/book/movie, clearly straight,"

Yes, very often that is true. In years past, of course, there were no characters on TV, in books or in movies who were homosexual. In those days, besides the many fanfiction authors who simply disagreed with the original authorial intention, other fanfiction writers who wished homosexual characters in the stories they shared had to either invent original homosexual characters -- and of course original characters are widely frowned on in fanfiction -- or address the characters whom they had received in canon.

One of the fascinating things happening today, I think, is the way that slash is sucking up stories that might once have been classified as gen, as canonical homosexual characters emerge and homosexuality increases in social acceptance. I don't mean only those stories labeled as "pre-slash," though they're certainly the bulk of this category, but all the otherwise "gen" stories in which the author simply assumes, for example, that the character John Sheppard of Stargate: Atlantis is hiding a homosexual orientation because of US military regulations, and this is completely canonical to the fan author, who might not believe that it's not intended by the professional creators. It is now ordinary for m/m fanfiction to assume open, life-long-recognized homosexuality for characters that is nevertheless not seen on screen (i.e. not canonical, by ordinary usage). I would have hoped that gen would have benefited from this, rather than been diminished by it, but that's doesn't seem to be presently the case.

>> if you can provide links that prove me wrong, I'm open to reading them. <<

I don't think that there's anything I wish to prove you wrong about, except the wording of the assertion that omitted lesbian and bisexual authors, and the assertion that the subjects of m/m fanfiction are necessarily perceived as heterosexual.

A friend who is a bisexual m/m fanfiction author offered these links:
http://trickster.org/symposium/
http://www.livejournal.com/community/ffsymposium/
http://delicious.com/metafandom/slash
http://delicious.com/metafandom/sexuality

Again, I'm not much of a slash fan, and my academic interests are primarily in nineteenth-century literature where, sure, subtext is big... but not that big. All I could personally usefully do is point you to two very recent m/m ficathons where people I know have been writing, as examples of current m/m fanfiction trends and conditions: mcshepmatch (SGA) and Snarry Games (HP). I do read John/Rodney fanfic for fun; I read Snarry fanfic only when written or strongly recommended by a personal friend.

This has been long. I'm sure I'm belaboring points that don't need that, but this is awkward, and I'm not confident of what is needed. I didn't want to leave your reply unanswered. Thanks.
dj_clawsondj_clawson on October 1st, 2009 05:30 am (UTC)
Re: on fanfiction called slash and femmeslash (02/02)
Textual Poachers is a pretty old book (we used it as course material when I ran a course on fanfiction at Brown in 2003) so I lot of it is outdated, but I found that the (male, I believe) author's insights into slash pairing selections and the feminization of gay sex as written by women to still hold up because it addresses the male and female generalized views on the sex act and how it appears in fiction as a result. I think the example discussed in the book - though it's been awhile so maybe it just came up in an article - was Mulder/Kryeck, obviously an old pairing that was once very popular. On the show they hated each other, making of course for lots of slash potential, and the author discussed how these antagonist characters were often portrayed in slash fiction as having a loving, almost tender relationship, which is just plain out-of-character for them.

As to slash versus gen, I have a story about that. In high school I ran a SWAT Kat cartoon fanfic archive. Originally I accepted all fiction of all ratings. After a year or two I was getting sort of overwhelmed by the NC-17 stuff (mostly het - slash hadn't gone so mainstream yet) and I decided it was my site and I had the right to pull the higher-rated stories if I wanted to, which I did. After all, it was a kiddie cartoon. At the time, I also thought it was appropriate to pull the few slash stories there were. There were actually femslash written buy a guy, something I haven't seen that often since, and only some of them were explicit. In retrospect, it would have made sense to me to keep up the slash that wasn't explicit, but at the time I deemed it "not appropriate for children" because it raised sexual questions. I think now that I was wrong and if forced to make the choice again, I would keep the non-explicit slash stories.
Amy R.: Caddybrightknightie on October 11th, 2009 08:06 pm (UTC)
Re: on fanfiction called slash and femmeslash (02/02)
>"I think now that I was wrong and if forced to make the choice again, I would keep the non-explicit slash stories."

When I recommended James's "Most Trunk Space in 30 Years" a few years ago -- a G-rated romantic comedy in which an original male character has a crush on Nick and Nick doesn't realize it -- it dawned on me that these days I would never imagine classifying it as "adult," but that when it first posted to the list fifteen or sixteen years ago, it didn't even occur to me to question the assumption that its content required labeling.
abby82: FK--Natalieabby82 on September 19th, 2009 08:29 am (UTC)
Wow! This is quite a list.

How about Nick and the rookie cop from "False Witness" who toasted him in the party scene. There was some major hero worship there. It would later be an interesting change in dynamic post "I Will Repay" because I believe it was that same rookie cop whose gun shot Richard and whom Nick really went off on.

Screed and carouche who brought over Perry? Although Screed is far more civilized.

With Cal or any of the CRCH guest stars I think an original character could help if a writer wanted to lean in the direction of male slash.

Janette/Natalie...yes please. It's my only real femslash pairing of choice.

You make interesting pairings with: Erica/Natalie, Janette/Helen Ruskin-Slater, and Natalie/Denise Ford.

Marian Blackwing/Natalie and Marian Blackwing/Tracy are other possibilities.
Amy R.: Nanettebrightknightie on September 19th, 2009 06:08 pm (UTC)
>"How about Nick and the rookie cop from "False Witness" who toasted him in the party scene. ... post "I Will Repay" because I believe it was that same rookie cop whose gun shot Richard and whom Nick really went off on."

Whom Nick really went off on? I need to review that scene, because I don't remember that... In any case, I did not know that this was the same person! He's not named, and is so minor, that with both of those conditions together, he didn't get on my character list for cross-referencing. (Which reminds me that I need to get back to that project and finish out third season.) I must observe the two! Fun. Thanks!

As to a story about a younger officer with a crush on the hero detective, that could be a very productive scenario, with several possible directions. Of course first-season Nick is not going to endanger any human, so that sets certain obvious constraints if one is going to stay within canon. But as Natalie canonically points out to Nick in so many words, on top of all the other evidence, people do give Nick a second look from time to time, and whether and how they act on it can become a story. Nick was confused, angry, guilty and hurt about how the force reacted when he finally told the truth in "False Witness." That could all be dramatically embodied in the perspective of that one man, who knows only Detective Knight, whom Nick so wants to be, not Nicolas de Brabant, whom he cannot escape.

>"Janette/Natalie...yes please. It's my only real femslash pairing of choice."

Ophelia has a fun zine story -- PG? -- with mild Janette/Natalie, blood and chocolate, and a confused and distressed Nick. I wonder whether she ever put it online, or whether the zine is still its only home? (Just checked her page: not there. Sorry.) And I remember a somewhat violent, not-to-my-taste but vivid, Janette/Natalie NC-17 by Darkangel from back in the day; it had a motorcycle, and things you ought not do if you're human. And there were a few others, none with substantial plots that I recall... Janette/Natalie stories have always seemed pretty rare, perhaps because we don't do much in the way of alternate realities in FK.

>"You make interesting pairings with: Erica/Natalie, Janette/Helen Ruskin-Slater, and Natalie/Denise Ford."

I was thinking that the thing about both Erica and Denise is that there is no reason Natalie couldn't have known them in the past, before the events of their episodes. It would be very dramatic to rewrite "Last Act" to learn at the end, when Nick takes Natalie and Schanke to the play, that the playwright, Nick's "old friend," is in fact someone Natalie knew years ago in her own life -- didn't, of course, know she was a vampire -- and perhaps had a parallel experience with Nick and Erica's of breaking up a romance that wasn't working because of philosophical differences. ~shrug~

Helen Ruskin-Slater -- from the "Faithful Followers" flashbacks, of course -- is smart, unconventional, upper-class and bold, and a platonic friend of Nick. Janette would not be interested in hanging about on a dig, but in a city, perhaps a university city...? And then there's the aspect that Lacroix is always going around killing Nick's friends, Ms. Ruskin-Slater included, but Janette's friends? What would she do, Janette "Revenge is the Best Revenge" duCharme?

Could be a story. And a good excuse for historical research. :-) Mmmmmm, history. ;-)
abby82: FK--Nat (close-up)abby82 on September 21st, 2009 02:46 am (UTC)
Whom Nick really went off on? I need to review that scene, because I don't remember that... In any case, I did not know that this was the same person! He's not named, and is so minor, that with both of those conditions together, he didn't get on my character list for cross-referencing.

I like minor character. They're blank slates. I had my suspicions that it was the same guy but the teaser in IWR goes by so fast that I never bothered to check. The Canadian cut has a clearer view of him here, here and here. Compare that to these these two caps from Knight Watchman. He even gets a name but it's undecipherable.

Since the marathon I've been toying with the idea of a fic, specifically his hero worship of Nick displayed in FW. I hadn't thought about a slash angle but you've brought up some interesting ideas. Chances are if I do try to write this it'll end up next to my unfinished Alix Logan story and the one about the cab driver who drove Nick and Nat home from Azure, lol, but it's still something to play with.

And I remember a somewhat violent, not-to-my-taste but vivid, Janette/Natalie NC-17 by Darkangel from back in the day...Janette/Natalie stories have always seemed pretty rare, perhaps because we don't do much in the way of alternate realities in FK.

I remember you mentioning this once before and while I'm glad it was written I don't know if graphic slash is up my reading alley. That's probably why "What Makes A Mortal Interesting by dknightshade and merfilly's "New Pleasure" hit the spot so perfectly.

RE: Erica/Natalie

It would be very dramatic to rewrite "Last Act" to learn at the end, when Nick takes Natalie and Schanke to the play, that the playwright, Nick's "old friend," is in fact someone Natalie knew years ago in her own life -- didn't, of course, know she was a vampire -- and perhaps had a parallel experience with Nick and Erica's of breaking up a romance that wasn't working because of philosophical differences.

I love this idea to pieces.

RE: Janette/Helen Ruskin-Slater

Helen Ruskin-Slater -- from the "Faithful Followers" flashbacks, of course -- is smart, unconventional, upper-class and bold, and a platonic friend of Nick. Janette would not be interested in hanging about on a dig, but in a city, perhaps a university city...?

I'm rather fond of the character. She had very few lines but any story exploring her more, whether it's in a slash story or not, sounds like a fascinating read.

RE: Natalie/Denise Ford

I'm actually rather surprised that our resident scientist didn't scoff at the idea of using a psychic. Instead she was rather impressed by Denise's abilities. Of course, now that her world view includes vampires, psychics could just be small potatoes but previous exposure could have contributed to Natalie's favorable opinion. Denise is shown exercising at home. We've never seen Natalie exercising but her third season "bad knee" could have come from an accident in a group class where the two ladies met. Maybe.

The episode suggests that Stonetree has used Denise's services in the past. That could also set up a scenario in which Natalie and Denise crossed paths prior to the episode via a case.

Natalie was also very supportive and encouraging of Nick telling Denise his secret. There was no jealousy at the possibility of no longer being Nick's resident mortal secret keeper. I'm unsure for the reason of a breakup in either of these scenarios but whatever they may be both women walked away happy and held no animosity towards each other.

Edited at 2009-09-21 02:48 am (UTC)
Amy R.: Nickbrightknightie on October 11th, 2009 08:17 pm (UTC)
>"The Canadian cut has a clearer view of him here, here and here. Compare that to these these two caps from Knight Watchman. He even gets a name but it's undecipherable."

Thank you very much for sharing those Chiller screenshots. As discussed elsewhere, they're actually the CBS version, and they're not on the DVDs. (Extras! They should be extras! ~g~)

I can't remember ever seeing that particular scene from "I Will Repay"! BUT... I have access to the German cuts on VHS. It will be there...

You're right that it could be the same actor. But then again, it might not. The guy next to Nick looks bigger than the guy next to Natalie...? I will remember to scrutinize the next time through.

>"Chances are if I do try to write this it'll end up next to my unfinished Alix Logan story and the one about the cab driver who drove Nick and Nat home from Azure, lol, but it's still something to play with."

You have an unfinished Alix Logan story? But of course, you've mentioned that before! Don't let it sleep forever; I think you can still be the first person to post a serious post-"Amateur Night" story!

>"We've never seen Natalie exercising but her third season "bad knee" could have come from an accident in a group class where the two ladies met. Maybe."

Good idea. Or Natalie could have taken a class after hurting her knee, to try to strengthen it.

>"The episode suggests that Stonetree has used Denise's services in the past. That could also set up a scenario in which Natalie and Denise crossed paths prior to the episode via a case."

Yes, this is a very strong possibility. Denise and Stonetree have canonically worked together before, and unlike Nick and Schanke who are conspicuously introduced to Denise for the first time, Natalie seems to get her introduction off-screen. They could easily have met in the vicinity of another case.
cousinmary: Kontrollcousinmary on October 22nd, 2009 10:13 pm (UTC)
Finally wandered over to your blog and now I'm going to trail Tracy-prints all over it ;-)

I've never written slash, gotten close a couple times, but Tracy/Janette always intrigued me. I always had the idea in my head that Janette did make children but had some sort of hording urge and didn't share them with Nick and Lacroix. I used to have reasons, now I just have vague impressions. But the master/fledgling dynamic between Janette and Tracy would be amazing, I think. Oh if only there were more hours in the day!

I'd read a Tracy/Urs too. If, for some reason, Vachon and Screed left TO I can see Urs gravitating to Tracy and wherever that might lead.

Tracy/Nat I don't see working, at all. I wrote one series of interactions between them and it was far from romantic. I'm not sure I can imagine them being at all attracted to each other, ever.

Amy R.: Tracybrightknightie on October 24th, 2009 06:43 am (UTC)
>"Finally wandered over to your blog and now I'm going to trail Tracy-prints all over it ;-) "

Glad to have you -- and Tracy! :-)

>"I always had the idea in my head that Janette did make children but had some sort of hording urge and didn't share them with Nick and Lacroix. I used to have reasons, now I just have vague impressions."

Sounds like a good excuse to rewatch some episodes. :-) Specifically, perhaps, "If Looks Could Kill," with Sofia Jurgen, the Baroness, and Bernice, Norma, and the other young-looking older women? It's certainly one solution to the apparent conflict between Janette's claim in "I Will Repay" to have never converted anyone, and her proximity to Sofia in ILCK. Interesting. Janette's first-season claim to be "not the mothering type" must always be opposed to her third-season admission of being "a mother to the strays" (or whatever that exact line in "The Human Factor" is).

>"Oh if only there were more hours in the day!"

I feel safe in suggesting that havocthecat would be delighted to read such a tale, if you find time on your hands. :-)

>"I'd read a Tracy/Urs too. If, for some reason, Vachon and Screed left TO I can see Urs gravitating to Tracy and wherever that might lead."

I headed vaguely that direction at the tail end of a story I wrote once, in which Vachon ditched Toronto, leaving both Tracy and Urs in difficult circumstances, but they were a subplot and their part of the story didn't get as far as making a call on whether it would stay platonic.

I have mixed feelings on what to do with Urs's male issues in any story that posits she might be bisexual. Canonically, it's explicit that Urs has a century-old fixation on male approval. It's the second biggest thing we know about her, after her feelings about death, dying and killing. I suppose one can write that as easily to make the alternative more likely to coexist as to negate it....

>"Tracy/Nat I don't see working, at all."

Not at all, at all! It's hard to even get them into the same room to exchange clues and comment on Nick. It's not that the hostility from "Outside the Lines" lingered, but just that they have absolutely nothing in common except the one thing Tracy doesn't know and Natalie can't talk about. They don't have similar interests, backgrounds, fears, hobbies, families, habits, humor... and I think that Tracy (and third season as a whole) made Natalie feel old, and not in a way that fostered bonding. To me, anyway, they just don't seem to click at any point.

I've tried twice in the past two years -- both times given prompts in ficathon games -- to write simple canonical interactions between Natalie and Tracy. Given how very challenging I found that, I would be fascinated, but perhaps in a car-wreck kind of way, to see anyone try to put those two into a romance. It seems nonsensical.